Tag Archives: Japan

Japanese rice art!

Seems all things Japanese and wonderful keep making their way into my life. This time my surprise came in the form of an email from my boyfriends mum.

Again it involves Japanese art. Hooooda-thunk-it!

Japanese farming villages have decided to take on a different approach to making their farming efforts unique. Aomori prefecture village of Inakadate, has earned a reputation for its rice illustration which was planted for the first time in the summer of 2009.

Sengoku Warrior

How do they do it? Well, if you are a Farmville player (hehe) you will know that rice comes in different colours. Farm workers need to strategically plant the rice in position, so that when it grows the colours paint a picture. The faster the crop grows the faster the illustration emerges.

FROM THIS…

Team work does wonders

TO THIS…

Can you see the image emerging?

TO THIS!!!

The final product

AWESOME!

See more images here.

In my last post about Japanese art I referred (and linked) to a famous historical artwork by Hokusai called the Great wave… If you recognise the image above and didn’t know why, there’s your explanation. It seems the Japanese realise that the rest of the world has an interest in this piece. They sure know talent when they see it.

I want to know how long these planting sessions take to plan! Congrats to the Japanese, innovation comes so easily to them!

Recreation and  productivity at the same time. Like a dream…It’s like finding a job that you enjoy.

I’m going to try it on my Farmville farm now! I’ll let you know how it works out 😉

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My art obsession confession

Contrary to popular belief, the first nations to make use of printing were the Chinese and Japanese in the early 1800’s.

Woodblock printing is the name of one of the techniques they used. As the name suggests they made use of wood to paint on and then press onto paper with. The technique was used mostly for art forms and in Chinese Buddhist temple books.

One of the artists in Japan to make use of this technique was Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). He is mostly remembered this beautiful painting of a wave in front of Mount Fuji which he called The Great Wave Off Kanagawa. Click on the link, you won’t be disappointed!

I’ve never studied art, which is kind of weird, because I’ve always found it really fascinating. So, when I came across the years of historical paintings and prints that Japanese artists left behind… I just couldn’t stop searching for more and more to feed my hungry eyeballs with!

THEN I found Fuco… and became obsessed.

Fuco Ueda is undoubtably my favourite artist at this point in time. Her work is both unethical and non-sensical, but at the same time captivating and freakishly awesome!

I can stare at these prints for hours on end…

Click here to go to http://www.fucoueda.com

I love her work, because it gives me a dreamy feeling. The detail of the girl’s hair in the images make me want to draw over them with precision and all the concentration I can offer. I could think up a story for every one of them.

This woman has the imagination of an old ‘twisted sister’ soul with the talent of a rainbow god.

I really don’t have any better words to describe her.

Pam Grossman, author of Phantasmaphile, had the following to say about Ueda’s work:

“The heroines of Fuco Ueda’s paintings are often on the brink of danger.  These beauties are at once victims and agents.  But whether the threats are self-inflicted or not, they make for fierce and beautiful narratives.”

Click on HERE to read Fuco Ueda’s bio and to see more of her work. It’s fantastic to see how she’s grown as an artist in the past decade or so. While you’re there would you mind purchasing and mailing me a print or two? hehe

So now it’s your turn…who is your favourite artist and why?

Add links to images please! I’m the one with the hungry eyes…